Not to minimize police harassment of photographers here in the US, but that’s nothing compared to the pain and suffering of Burmese photographers at the hands of that country’s regime.

According to a report in the Burmese opposition news site Irrawaddy, a Burmese court sentenced photographer Sithu Zeya to eight years in prison yesterday for photographing the aftermath of the April 15, 2010 bomb blast in Rangoon. The blast killed 10 and injured 70.

Zeya’s actions were violations of the country’s Immigration Act and Unlawful Associations Act, Irrawaddy reports. The photographer’s lawyer says he will appeal the conviction, because it was based not upon eyewitness accounts of Zeya’s actions, but upon a confession that Zeya reportedly made “during interrogation.”

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