Photographer Ejaz Raeesani of the European Pressphoto Agency (epa) died September 6 from injuries he sustained in a suicide bomb attack in Quetta, Pakistan on September 3, epa reports. Raeesani, 30,  was in Quetta, in the province of Balochistan, to cover a  Shiite Muslim demonstration when a suicide bomber blew himself up.  An estimated 100 people were injured and 55 people were killed in the attack, which took place in the Balochistan province, an area hard-hit by recent flooding.

Photographer Ejaz Raeesani of the European Pressphoto Agency (epa) died September 6 from injuries he sustained in a suicide bomb attack in Quetta, Pakistan on September 3, epa reports.

Raeesani, 30,  was in Quetta, in the province of Balochistan, to cover a  Shiite Muslim demonstration when a suicide bomber blew himself up.  An estimated 100 people were injured and 55 people were killed in the attack, the Washington Post reported. The Balochistan province has been  hard-hit by recent flooding.

Raeesani was taken to an area hospital, but died of his wounds.

A native of Mastan, Pakistan, Ejaz worked for the Asaaf newspaper in Quetta and   as a camera man for a Quetta TV news program before joining epa as a freelance photographer for epa.

In a joint statement, epa’s CEO Joerg Schierenbeck and Editor-in-Chief Cengiz Seren condemned the violence that killed Raessani and offered condolences to his wife and their two children.

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